Solar Builder

JUL-AUG 2018

Solar Builder focuses on the installation/construction of solar PV systems. We cover the latest PV technology (modules, mounting, inverters, storage, BOS) and equip installers/contractors with tips and tools to make informed purchasing decisions.

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SOLARBUILDERMAG.COM | 15 Other states have included incentives for multifamily solar adoption in their broader solar programs. In Colorado, the Denver Housing Authority's 2-MW LMI solar garden model has shown a scalable model through utility partnerships for offsite generation. In Massachusetts, the SREC II program has awarded a higher price for solar renewable energy credits that are generated by projects that are considered community shared solar projects or that serve affordable housing. When the SREC II program ends, it will be replaced by the new Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) program that will award a higher incentive for solar projects that serve affordable housing. Final thought It is a big opportunity, though there are clear market and economic barriers. Ignoring this segment and these potential barriers could significantly limit the long-term size of the rooftop solar market. "Solar can have tremendous benefits for low-income communities in addition to diversifying and de-carbonizing our national energy mix," said Tim Sears, chief operating officer for GRID Alternatives. "We hope this research will give more states the data they need to develop effective low-income solar programs and build a more equitable clean energy economy." The report is accompanied by a web application ( maps.nrel.gov/solarforall ) that enables users to assess solar technical poten- tial for their communities. This tool makes it possible to visualize the amount of low- income solar potential in a specific neigh- borhood, for example, while also enabling identification of neighborhoods with both high solar potential and high electricity costs where rooftop solar could provide cost- effective electricity generation. Check it out and see if it sparks any new ideas. The poten- tial is there, it just needs to be tapped. Chris Crowell is the managing editor of Solar Builder. Using LIDAR data from Homeland Security to examine 23 percent of U.S. building stock, the researchers inferred the solar potential of building footprints and unshaded roof area, azimuth, tilt and roof plane. Age cannot be detect - ed so was not considered. This was then matched with socio-economic demographic data from the Census and building stock data to understand total usable rooftop area for LMI house- holds. A statistical model was then created to make estimates of areas not covered by the available LIDAR data (stuff like household counts, number of suitable buildings, etc.) They then dove into three representative regions to infer more in-depth information. Methodology

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